joint Solution-Focused Practice Group: 25th January 2022

The joint Solution-Focused Practice Group sessions are for people who have had some training in solution-focused practice, and wish to meet with others to develop their skills.

The sessions, co-facilitated by Guy Shennan and Marc Gardiner, are a continuing professional development opportunity which aims to bring together people committed to working in a solution-focused way to develop skills and build networks. Sessions comprise any one or more of:

  • Teaching
  • skills practice
  • case studies
  • group exercises and discussions
  • SF sessional video footage

– all good opportunities for practitioners to step back from the daily work and reflect, learn and refresh.

Attendance at these sessions costs: £25 + VAT.

Book here

Further planned 2022 sessions (always 9.30am-12.30pm) for the diary :

For more information contact: info@zebra.coop

If a group session is cancelled, payments will be refunded or transferred to a future session. Cancellation by participants up to 72 hours before the date and time of the event can be refunded or the credit transferred to a future session.

Friday 25th March
Friday 20th May
Friday 15th July
Friday 23rd September
Friday 25 November


For those more local to Zebra in the Westcountry and who participate in or are interested in joining our South West Solution-focused Practice Group the next session will be on 17th February.

Hilary Cottam’s Radical Help: possibilities and clues for social work

Marc is looking forward to the innovative Advocates and Allies Conference of the Irish Association of Social Workers which is bringing together Radical and Relationship-based Social Work Practices on 30th September in Dublin. He’s a speaker and will be talking about Hilary Cottam’s Radical Help: possibilities and  clues for social work?

In 2018, social activist Hilary Cottam published Radical Help, her account of several action research projects conducted around England over a decade seeking answers to the question of how the system can be helpful to people in the 21st century.

 Her findings are truly radical, and yet perhaps rather intuitive – even obvious: we humans need meaning and purpose, and a picture of how we’d like our life to be; we all, always, have strengths to draw upon in our efforts to get there – and building our capabilities further is essential too; we want human connection, so excellent relationships – with friends, neighbours, workers – is key; and we engage when we’re in control, setting our own agenda.

 Ms Cottam’s projects were tightly evaluated and demonstrated some very encouraging results. So what clues do these projects offer to statutory social work? The duties of the department and the social work role may currently constrain, but here’s an opportunity to see what possibilities we can tease out.