Solution-focused Approach Online 2-Day Course

Wednesdays 23rd & 30th September
9.30 am – 4.00pm

using Zoom

£160+VAT per person –  price includes cost of attendance at one subsequent Practitioner Group session of your choice; 40-page course notes and an attendance certificate with learning outcomes listed.

Discounts available for individuals self-financing (low income), and for 2+ bookings.

Contact: Marc Gardiner:  info@zebra.coop to book, or with any enquiries.

The solution-focused approach is a versatile communication tool that can have real power in work with anyone who is stuck with big problems, as well as those just contemplating making some changes in life.

About the course

Tired of getting stuck looking at the problem? This two-day course will leave you thinking and working in a powerful new way. It may change your life.

The ideas, values and skills of solution-focused communication are helpful to anyone who works with people: the focus moves away from the problem towards preferred futures, strengths, resilience and competencies, progress already made, and possibilities.

The power of this approach has long been evidenced in helping services, community work and schools, but is becoming recognised also in personnel management, organisational development, and coaching.

Solution-focused communication is a “non-expert” approach to helping and change work. That is, it’s not based on the notion that the worker knows best. There’s a paradox here, though, in that to learn to function as an effective, truly non-expert practitioner takes some expertise.

This course offers new communication skills and fosters personal & professional development, and will be useful to anyone who works with people – particularly those who support others through problems and change (e.g. workers in social care and housing support settings, mental health workers, community workers and health staff) and staff / team / organisation managers etc.

Learning outcomes

By the end of this online two-day workshop you will:

·         Have a working knowledge of the philosophy, value base, and key tools and techniques of solution-focused communication

·         Have experience of a solution-focused conversation, both as worker and client

·         Have insight into how the learning can be applied and sustained in your individual work context

·         Have an action plan and an immediate first step for consolidating and building on the learning, and for your future use of solution-focused communication

·         Know about the local networks for keeping in touch with solution-focused workers

What people said about this course:

“An excellent trainer with firm knowledge & skills, & a sustained belief – inspirational.”

 “Most valuable, interesting training session for a long time. Thanks.”

 “Wasn’t sure after first day whether this could be useful in support work – convinced now … <and> … would like to practice more…fascinating.”

 “The best training I have been on since I can remember! I believe this will have a huge impact on my working and personal life! Thank you.”

 “I think it is life changing – thanks.”

Devon Solution-focused Practitioner Group

Thursday 5th March 2020 3-6pm

please book a place

Venue: Exeter Community Centre,
17 St Davids Hill, Exeter EX4 3RG

The practitioner groups are a continuing professional development (CPD) service that aims to bring together people committed to solution-focused working to develop skills and build networks.

Sessions may comprise any one or more of:
* teaching
* skills practice
* case studies
* group exercises
* video analysis
– all good opportunities for practitioners to step back from the daily work and reflect, learn and refresh. Plus plenty of good networking.

CPD attendance certificates can be issued.

Please ensure you book your place(s) as we need a minimum of 10 bookings to make it financially viable for Zebra to run this session – thanks.

For more information or to book: contact: info@zebra.coop

Tel: 01752 606415

Attendance at these sessions costs:

£25+VAT if funded by your employer.

£20 including VAT if sole trader /microbusiness

£10 including VAT if self-financing (low income).  Receipts / invoices will be issued.

Light refreshments provided.

Plymouth Solution-focused Practitioner Group

Monday 20th January 2020, 3 – 6pm

Venue:  Welcome Hall, 4 Fore St, Devonport, Plymouth PL1 4DN

The practitioner groups are a continuing professional development (CPD) service that aims to bring together people committed to solution-focused working to develop skills and build networks.  Sessions may comprise any one or more of:
* teaching
* skills practice
* case studies
* group exercises
* video analysis
– all good opportunities for practitioners to step back from the daily work and reflect, learn and refresh. Plus plenty of good networking.

CPD attendance certificates can be issued.

Please ensure you book your place(s) by 5th  January as we need a minimum of 10 bookings to make it financially viable for Zebra to run this session – thanks.

For more information or to book: contact Marc Gardiner:  info@zebra.coop / 01752 606415

Attendance at these sessions costs:

£25+VAT if funded by your employer.

£20 including VAT if sole trader / microbusiness

£10 including VAT if self-financing (low income).  Receipts / invoices will be issued.

Light refreshments provided.

 

Solution-focused Practice 2-day Example Outline

The solution-focused approach is a versatile and powerful way of creating conversations of possibility and change. The ideas, values and skills of solution-focused practice are helpful to anyone who works with people: the focus moves away from the problem towards preferred futures, strengths, resourcefulness, resilience, progress already made, and possibilities.

The power of this approach has long been evidenced in the full range of helping services, community work and schools and is now recognised also in personnel management, organisational development, and coaching.

Solution-focused is a “non-expert” approach: that is, everyone is the expert in what it is to be themselves, with their unique story and meanings, motivations, values etc. The worker, then, doesn’t know best, and has no advice to give, few suggestions to make: their job is to ask questions that foster the person’s best thinking. (The paradox here in that to be an effective, truly non-expert practitioner takes some expertise.)

Solution-focused offers strong, very adaptable new ways of thinking and practicing for change workers, and is useful to anyone who supports others through problems and change, e.g. workers in mental health, health, social care, housing, community work, and staff / team / organisation managers.

Learning outcomes

By the end of this two-day workshop you will:

  1. Have a working knowledge of the philosophy, value base, and key tools and techniques of solution-focused practice
  2. Have experience on both sides of a solution-focused conversation
  3. Have insight into how the learning can be applied and sustained in your specific work context
  4. Have an action plan and an immediate first step for consolidating and building on the learning, and for your future use of the solution-focused approach
  5. Know about the local networks for keeping in touch with solution-focused workers

 

Participant Numbers:  up to 15

 

 

 

Power and Privilege

In any social context (grouping of people, from family & neighbourhood to workplace and society), there are power differentials operating all the time.

Power derives from a range of sources such as roles (both formal and informal), status, identity and ability.

A person who enjoys privileged status owing to differentials in what society values, holds more power than those less privileged.

This power plays out constantly in subtle and overt ways, and we are all at risk of misusing the power we hold and being misused by others’ power.

However, it’s not as straightforward as this sounds, because we all hold multiple roles and identities, some of which are privileged, others not, e.g. a gay man: i.e. we have intersecting roles and identities, which create complexity.

It takes recognition of the above concepts of power, privilege, identity, intersectionality and a commitment to positive action to address their impact in our personal lives and within the work and social roles we hold; and a high level of reflection and reflexivity, to be effective in managing our power and privileges.

This workshop seeks to promote understanding and awareness of the dynamics of power and privilege and their impact and offers the opportunity to develop self-awareness, reflection and reflexivity and explore practical steps to redress negative impact.

Learning Outcomes:

  • To explore issues of power and privilege and how these affect roles and relationships in individual contexts as well as organisationally
  • To increase understanding of how the nature and extent of privilege differs from person to person through our intersecting identities
  • To identify how unrecognised and unacknowledged power and privilege operate
  • To reflect on the range of our own powers and how we use our personal and positional power
  • To explore practical steps that can be taken to increase positive action and redress the negative impact of power relations and privilege on our work and with those we work
  • To reflect on our practice through the lens of power and privilege

Workshop format:

Interactive and informal facilitation involving experiential and reflective exercises, discussions, in pairs and in small groups.

Contact: info@zebra.coop for further details.

Mental Health Recovery Course Outline Example

This one day session builds on our Mental Health Awareness workshop, looking in more depth at progressive thinking in mental health – commonly captured under the label of “recovery approaches”.

The word “recovery” can confuse, with its medical overtones and absolute connotations. But it has passed into the discourse nonetheless, whenever we are looking at:

  • understanding processes of stigmatisation & exclusion, & adopting valuing,
    inclusive and empowering principles and service implementation
  • personal meanings, narrative approaches – finding new, empowering stories
    to make sense of oneself and one’s difficulties, as an alternative to limiting &
    problem / deficit-saturated stories established by others (family, community,
    services etc.)
  • non-medical understandings of mental health issues
  • person-centred rather than system-driven approaches
  • resource, competence and resilience focus rather than problem / deficit focus
  • hope and possibility
  • emphasis on preferred futures and small steps to change
  • self-management, balanced with strong emphasis on the essential value of
    excellent human relationships

This workshop takes a look at all these ideas, giving participants an opportunity to
find out more about each, and to reflect on the implications for their organisation and
for their own thinking and practice.

Learning Outcomes
By participating in this workshop, participants will:

  • Build their understanding of the meaning of “recovery” in the mental health
    context, and the historical background to it
  • Examine the values and principles that underpin recovery
  • Look in depth at the key elements of recovery, as listed above, developing a
    deeper understanding of each
  • Apply recovery ideas to their own workplace, devising the beginnings of a plan
    for further development and improvement of their work in light of the day’s
    learning

Mental Health Awareness Course Outline Example

Mental Health Awareness

Mental health is increasingly a topic of public discussion, which is good news, as public awareness is an essential step in reducing stigma. However, the topic remains deeply misunderstood and misrepresented, thus fear and exclusion continue, impacting massively on a person experiencing mental health difficulties.

And that can be any of us.

This workshop seeks to address the misunderstandings, so that participants leave better informed on the subject and with a better idea of how to be helpful to a person struggling with mental health issues.

The session includes:

  • What is “mental health”?
  • What are “mental health problems”?
  • Where’s the problem? Understanding how poverty, inequality, abuse and discrimination (i.e. traumatic experiences) are all drivers of poor mental health
  • How am I? The mental health continuum
  • The myths and the media
  • Language: from devaluation & exclusion to a valuing discourse
  • What helps? A handful of key values, attitudes & skills that really make a difference when engaging with a person whose mental health is poor right now

Participants explore their beliefs and attitudes on the subject, and reflect on their own mental health. They reflect on the implications of the session’s learning for their work in community contexts: how they might think, speak and act differently.

A variety of engaging formats keep things moving: a case study, video, presentations, large & small group discussion, a practice self-assessment exercise.

Learning Outcomes

By participating in this workshop, you will:

  • Improve your understanding of mental health and mental health problems, including up-to-date thinking on the nature of these
  • Reflect on your own mental health, and where you are on the continuum
  •  Learn about the nature and impact of discrimination, stigma and exclusion in mental health – arguably more damaging than any condition; this includes an examination of the media and the myths it promotes (and sometimes creates), plus the language of exclusion
  • Learn the key elements of progressive thinking and practice in mental health
  • Apply these ideas to your own workplace

Cultural Capability

This workshop explores essential elements which promote cultural capability in professional practice by:

  • Defining cultural capability, and recognising its complexity:
  • Defining cultural relativism, and recognising its complexity
  • Making links between culture, power and oppression
  • Raising awareness of the impact of personal beliefs and values of participants on their work and relationships with others

Workshop Outline & Learning Outcomes

  • To recognise the diverse cultural, historical and socio-economic context of Devon/Cornwall in 2018
  • To explore personal identities, values and attitudes, and how these affect communication, relationship-building and all aspects of professional practice
  • To reflect on learnings, recommendations, group wisdom and perspectives
  • To explore this through case studies

Workshop format

  • Regular discussions, in pairs and in small groups
  • Interactive and informal facilitation involving exercises to suit different learning needs (will ask for this information before designing the activities further and to make any adaptations if necessary)
  • Time to reflect on learning outcomes
  • Encouraged to build on what the individual knows and does already fostering the idea that everyone is a resource

 Conversational tools

Solution-focused questions: open, & positively framed:

# Strengths not weaknesses

# Opportunities and possibilities

# Using strengths, opportunities and possibilities to cross hurdles

Contact: info@zebra.coop to book or with any enquiries.

Challenging Discrimination

Within your role you will at times be required to challenge others’ behaviour because you think it is potentially discriminatory.

You might need to challenge in order to:

  • Promote an inclusive and positive environment that is free of discrimination and that values difference
  • Reinforce the policies and procedures of your organisation
  • Ensure you do not breach the equalities legal framework

Knowing what, when and how to challenge can be tricky. There is some language and behaviour that is absolutely unacceptable such as language that is racist, sexist or homophobic or unlawful discrimination.

There are also many situations where it doesn’t seem so clear cut. In this course we’ll consider questions such as “What constitutes inappropriate banter?” or “They meant no offence, it was only a joke. Do I still need to challenge?”. You’ll come away with a clear understanding of when and why challenge is necessary.

Learning outcomes

By the end of this one-day workshop you will…

  • Know about the forms of discrimination that are covered by the Equality Act 2010
  • Feel confident about promoting equality and inclusion
  • Know when it is necessary to challenge discrimination
  • Understand the principles of constructive and respectful challenging
  • Be able to challenge discrimination using a solution-focused approach

 

Contact: info@zebra.coop to book, or with any enquiries.

 

Promoting Equality & Challenging Discrimination Workshop

What does Promoting Equality look like in 2019?

We know that people are individuals with a multitude of identities, experiences, thoughts and feelings. And we as workers / practitioners / citizens are looking at the world through our own unique lens which sometimes contains conflicting interests / biases / prejudices as well as compassion, curiosity and a commitment to social justice.

How can we challenge discrimination without putting a person on the defensive, and instead create the conditions for genuine opportunities for change of attitude and practice?

This workshop will encourage you to explore what you know and do already, what your strengths and resources are in promoting equality and how you can build on these in your unique work / life context and within the remits and duties of equality legislation.

We will create and hold a learning environment where you can leave feeling energised, hopeful, reflective and confident to really embed the principles of equality and inclusion into your everyday practice and work culture.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this one-day workshop you will…

  • Be able to describe and analyse concepts such as equality, prejudice, discrimination, intersectionality and the cycle of systematic oppression and understand some of its impact
  • Have an up to date knowledge of current equalities legislation and raised confidence in applying this knowledge
  • Demonstrate the choice and use of language which actively promotes equality and be able to explain confidently why some language and behaviour may be inappropriate
  • Develop awareness and understanding of the emotional impact of discrimination to self and others
  • Be able to appropriately and respectfully challenge discrimination using a solution focused approach
  • Create a personal action plan for promoting equality within your practice

What people have said  about this course –

“Very good and interactive, I liked that it wasn’t just reading from a PowerPoint. Enjoyed the in-depth discussions especially around political correctness and use of language.”

 

Contact: info@zebra.coop to book, or with any enquiries.